History

Garland Mineral Springs Lodge destroyed by fire in January 1961.
Garland Mineral Springs Lodge destroyed by fire in January 1961.

Garland was originally developed into a spa-resort during the 1930s to capitalize on the therapeutic value of the hot mineral springs on the property. A lodge with 22 cabins, stables and an olympic-size pool fed by the hot springs drew visitors to the pristine mountain location. The two primary mineral springs flow 25 million gallons of mineral water per year. The main underground pool is located 400’ below the surface, with temperatures of about 120° F. The site is located on the Straight Creek fault line in the North Cascades.

Garland Mineral Springs lies in an alluvial valley with about 18” of topsoil that had many old growth trees, some of which were up to 1,000 years old.

Starting in 1953 Garland Mineral Springs was used as a youth camp and church conference center.
Starting in 1953 Garland Mineral Springs was used as a youth camp and church conference center.

Garland was named for A. H. Bert Garland of Wenatchee, who prospected in the region in 1894, and purchased property from Mr. and Mrs. J. N. Starr. Previous names were Soda Springs and Starr Hot Springs. During WWII, Garland served as a Military training site.

In 1953, the Rev. Cameron Sharpe, his wife Medora, and her sister Laura Mae (widow of U.S.A.F. Capt. Raymond Mooney), purchased Garland for use as a youth camp and church conference center. A devastating flood in fall 1959, and the destruction of the historic lodge from fire in January 1961 ended the possibility of economic operation of the resort.

During the years the Sharpe and Mooney families operated Garland, hundreds of people found restored relationships with their families and their creator.